COVERS & CAPERS

London

Posts from the “Michelin starred” Category

Wild Honey – St. George Street

Posted on March 17, 2015

We’d just spent the last 5 minutes slagging off the scallops when the waitress came over to clear the starters. “How was everything?” she asked with mild concern, a phrase that when fed into Giles Coren’s ultra-cynical restaurant-speak decoding device drops out the other end as: ‘like I give a f*ck’. There was a hesitant pause. We weren’t happy but it’s a lot easier to say so when the aproned backs are turned and the dishes’ architects will remain oblivious in the basement kitchen below. “Just ok”, said Chris in brutally honest fashion taking the table by surprise. But he was right. The relatively clean plates suggested otherwise but we’d been waiting one very long hour, neglected in plain sight, for under-caramelized scallops with…

The Hand and Flowers – West Street, Marlow

Posted on January 30, 2015

The Hand and Flowers can’t be a pub because it’s nobody’s local. Sure, it looks like a pub. It has low, uneven ceilings, and even lower beams – the type that require a sign of caution – and a few ale pumps standing to attention, pricked like a set of hare’s ears, ready to maintain the pubby frontage with every pull of a pint. But it isn’t a pub. It’s a high-end restaurant in boozy drag, one that’s bloody difficult to get into. It becomes clear on entry. A handsome extension houses the bar, which, topped with polished pewter, gleams against the exposed brickwork and glows like bread oven, its under lighting exhibiting a thing of real beauty. And rightly so – the bar…

Yauatcha – Broadwick Street

Posted on November 15, 2014

Time flies when you’re having dim sum. Being drip-fed dumplings somehow quickens the clock. Underneath Broadwick Street in Yauatcha’s basement dining room, steady time evaporates. Down there it’s perpetual night. The pitch-dark ceiling with its constellation of tiny spotlights purges the room of daylight. Cerulean glass, gloomy brickwork and obsidian floors interrupt quotidian reality: you can eat dim sum from midday to midnight, completely ignorant to the passage of time; unless you have a film to catch, which I did. In fact, Christopher Nolan’s latest epic, Interstellar, positions ‘time’ at its thematic heart. Matthew McConaughey plays an astronaut whose job is to find an alternative planet for humanity as Earth nears its apocalypse, an intergalactic mission illustrating the mind-boggling effects of time dilation. This…